5 seconds captured this iconic image of Fresno’s history as it fell

July 4, 2017

John Walker/The Fresno Bee

Then: Carl Crawford- at right in the small photo at center- was the Fresno Bee photographer who covered the sad end of the Fresno County Courthouse dome as it met its end on April 7, 1966, and sent a lasting message for historic preservation through the jolting images.

“Death in the Afternoon,” is how the Fresno Bee described it. In the chronicle of Fresno County history, one iconic image has stood out. This was Carl Crawford’s capture of history crashing down on April 7, 1966, the day the Fresno County Courthouse dome crumpled to the ground.

Crawford was a 29-year-old photographer Crawford for the Fresno Bee, when he was dispatched to capture the end of the 92-year-old Fresno County Courthouse dome.

He was armed with a 35mm Nikon F camera, mounted with a medium range 135mm lens, and equipped with an early (and unreliable) motor drive. Former Fresno Bee photographer Richard Darby said each time the camera/ motor drive were used, problems occurred, and it was shipped off to Jensen Camera Repair to be fixed. Chief Photographer Lew Hegg, who’d been at the Fresno Bee since its early days, looked down upon the 35mm technology that was infiltrating the photo scene at the newspaper, versus the old tried and true, 4×5 Speed Graphic and 120mm format cameras. He called them “tourist cameras.” The camera Crawford used for this monumental event was the only one for the staff, a “pool” camera used for special assignments- and this was one of those for sure.

Fresno Bee reporter Eli Setencich wrote: “The demolition crew arrived early and in a destructive mood.” They bragged that it would take maybe a couple of hours to topple the 50-ton dome. Demolition began on the main structure a few weeks early, using the swinging force of a massive wrecking ball, taking down the outer wings, until the central part under the dome stood. The cupola which crowned the dome was saved weeks earlier (It stands at the Fresno Fairgrounds). But on this day, taking down the dome was the prize of the crew, who bragged it would take no longer than 2 hours to take down. It ended up taking up taking over 9 hours.

The courthouse, built in dramatic neoclassical style which drew inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman design, had a pretty long life. But it was not even close to what was predicted by Fresno County District Attorney Claudius Galen Sayle, keynote speaker at its groundbreaking on Oct. 8, 1874.

“The said edifice, when completed, is expected to stand the storms of winter and the heat of summer, for the period of 1,000 years or more,” he declared.

By the early 1960s, officials saw the old courthouse as obsolete, antiquated, cramped, and unsafe. A structural survey said it would not withstand a strong earthquake. The board of supervisors, viewing restoration as too expensive, voted for demolition, and to replace it with the current version, an imposing eight-story structure built in the midcentury modern style.

But preservationists didn’t go down without a fight. Lawsuits were filed, reaching the State Supreme court twice. But the supervisors prevailed, and construction of the new courthouse began in 1964, in front of the old one.

Friends of the old courthouse had their say during the 1964 elections, organized so effectively that three supervisors who supported demolition were voted out of office.

Early in the morning, on April 7, 1966, outside the safety fence people started gathering on the east side of M Street, lining up as though expecting a parade. (A similar carnival type crowd- estimated at 4,000, men, women and children, gathered at nearly the same place, for a real-life death, for the hanging of convicted killer, Dr. Frank Vincent in Fresno County’s only execution, on Oct. 27, 1893.)

The heavy wrecking ball began by pounding away at the shell of the building. Bricks crumbled and fell and the dome barely “twitched,” said Setencich. The main holdup: probably the strongest part of the building, the steel elevator shaft. The ball was removed, and a dragline hook attached to the heavy machinery. A crane and bulldozer were used.

The tugging and shaking went on for hours, with cables, one after another, snapping. The dome was described as being like an empty cup on a saucer, rattling, but holding fast. The dome would not go down without a fight. The ball was put back in to play, slamming into the elevator shaft, but the dome stayed put.

Setencich reports the death of the dome:

Finally, about 4:30, a two-pronged attack was made, with two cables attached, one to a bulldozer pulling low, the crane cable pulling high on the elevator shaft.

The machines under the pressure grunting and spewing smoke, yanked and strained. the dome tilted. and the high cable snapped. “Give up?” someone in the crowd shouted.

the workmen spliced the cable and went back to their task. Some in the crowd, sensing the kill, moved into position.

At 4:55, the shaking resumed. The dome wobbled back and forth. “Go, Go, Go,” the crowd chanted. A minute later the 50-ton dome slowly tipped eastward, pulled loose from its mounting and, like a giant ship sinking into the ocean, started down.

In about 5 seconds, it slammed explosively to the ground in a cloud of gray-black dust collectively over half a century.

“I’ve never seen anything like it in my 31 years in this business,” said a smiling (crane operator Robert) Ramey. “It’s the first one you could shake and not move. It was tougher than I thought.”

The mass of twisted steel and wood lay on the ground, looking as if it had been ripped by dynamite.

The spectators, now quiet, moved among the ruins, picking up bits of history. They had seen the end of an era.

In the 5 seconds it took for the dome to finally fall, Crawford’s motor drive, ploddingly pulled the Tri-X film through the camera, taking 9 shots of the destruction. Frame number 7- the 500th of a second was the one used on The Bee’s front page, as well as a full-page spread in Life magazine. (by comparison, today’s digital cameras can capture about 10 frames per second).

Before rewinding the film and heading back to The Bee, he made what was probably the most poignant photograph of the demolition. After the dust had settled and the echoes faded off the nearby Hall of Records, a small crowd of onlookers stood looking mournfully at the massive pile of courthouse debris-looking as if a mighty explosion had taken place- of twisted steel beams, wood and deep mounds of the estimated 800,000 bricks used to build it. A husband with arm around his wife, men with arms folded behind backs, hands in pockets, and curious children exploring the dust-covered ruins. The photograph speaks volumes, if only for its silence.

Carl Crawford worked for The Fresno Bee for 37 years, and retired at 59 years old. He died at age 70 on Nov. 14, 2006

In a Fresno Bee tribute to Crawford, Jill Moffat, then executive director of the Fresno City and County Historical Society, said his courthouse photographs will last as long as Fresno. “They have been on a little mission, a constant reminder of the importance of saving our built heritage.”

Carl Crawford- at right in the small photo at center- was the Fresno Bee photographer who covered the sad end of the Fresno County Courthouse dome as it met its end on April 7, 1966, and sent a lasting message for historic preservation through the jolting images.

Carl Crawford- at right in the small photo at center- was the Fresno Bee photographer who covered the sad end of the Fresno County Courthouse dome as it met its end on April 7, 1966, and sent a lasting message for historic preservation through the jolting images.

The place where the iconic dome of the 92-year-old Fresno County Courthouse came to rest in a dust-engulfed, mangled pile of debris, is today a tranquil walkway on the Mariposa Mall, north of the present courthouse and next to the Hall of Records.

The place where the iconic dome of the 92-year-old Fresno County Courthouse came to rest in a dust-engulfed, mangled pile of debris, is today a tranquil walkway on the Mariposa Mall, north of the present courthouse and next to the Hall of Records.


Carl Crawford captured a poignant scene in his last frame, one that shows a small group of onlookers, mournfully looking over the mangled pile that once was the dome of the historic Fresno County Courthouse, in this unpublished photograph.

Carl Crawford captured a poignant scene in his last frame, one that shows a small group of onlookers, mournfully looking over the mangled pile that once was the dome of the historic Fresno County Courthouse, in this unpublished photograph.

The earliest photograph of the Fresno County Courthouse, circa 1875, shortly after completion, sitting on the sandy plains of the Sinks of Dry Creek.

The earliest photograph of the Fresno County Courthouse, circa 1875, shortly after completion, sitting on the sandy plains of the Sinks of Dry Creek.

1870s view up Mariposa Street past Broadway to the courthouse

1870s view up Mariposa Street past Broadway to the courthouse

A dapper group of men pose for a photograph with the courthouse in background, c. 1880s. They were along J Street (Van Ness), in a section that might have been a convenient place to sell things. Wagon at right has a for sale sign, and to left out of this frame, is a sign on the fence reading "books, 50-cents.

A dapper group of men pose for a photograph with the courthouse in background, c. 1880s. They were along J Street (Van Ness), in a section that might have been a convenient place to sell things. Wagon at right has a for sale sign, and to left out of this frame, is a sign on the fence reading “books, 50-cents.

View up Mariposa c. early 1890s, with the copper domed version of the courthouse.

View up Mariposa c. early 1890s, with the copper domed version of the courthouse.

Copper dome version of the courthouse before the catastrophic fire of 1895. The dome melted, and damage was severe, but the courthouse was renovated and new dome built.

Copper dome version of the courthouse before the catastrophic fire of 1895. The dome melted, and damage was severe, but the courthouse was renovated and new dome built.

The gleaming courthouse c. 1900 in a view up Mariposa.

The gleaming courthouse c. 1900 in a view up Mariposa.

Fresno County Courthouse in 1962.

Fresno County Courthouse in 1962.

Infrared photograph by the Bee's John Lombardi.

Infrared photograph by the Bee’s John Lombardi.

An option presented to supervisors, in hopes of  keeping the old courthouse, was to renovate it and create a new one-in keeping with its neo-classic architecture, and wrap it around the old one.

An option presented to supervisors, in hopes of keeping the old courthouse, was to renovate it and create a new one-in keeping with its neo-classic architecture, and wrap it around the old one.

Rare aerial color photo of the courthouse. Construction is underway as seen behind it for the new courthouse.

Rare aerial color photo of the courthouse. Construction is underway as seen behind it for the new courthouse.

The sequence captured by Carl Crawford of the fall of the courthouse dome.

The sequence captured by Carl Crawford of the fall of the courthouse dome.

A published sequence titled "Death in the Afternoon."

A published sequence titled “Death in the Afternoon.”

The sequence captured by Carl Crawford of the fall of the courthouse dome.

The sequence captured by Carl Crawford of the fall of the courthouse dome.

Post dome demolition showing one of the last remnants of the courthouse, the iconic pillars amidst the ruins.

Post dome demolition showing one of the last remnants of the courthouse, the iconic pillars amidst the ruins.

Fresno Bee photographer Carl Crawford, right, editing film with chief photographer John Lombardi.

Fresno Bee photographer Carl Crawford, right, editing film with chief photographer John Lombardi.

Carl Crawford was equipped with a Nikon F similar to this 1965 version. His had a motor drive.

Carl Crawford was equipped with a Nikon F similar to this 1965 version. His had a motor drive.

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